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Saturday, August 6, 2016

Yogurt Substitution Guide

6 comments:

  1. I'm not fond of any yogurt! I love cottage cheese though and almost always have some in my fridge. I bought a whole turkey at Publix yesterday for 59 cent a pound- I figured I'd eat on it for 3 or 4 days and then make and freeze soup. I know some people don't use their oven in the summer but I do- I'll start roasting it Wednesday at 5 AM if it's thawed and it will be done long before noon. No stuffing though- I'm trying to low carb.

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    1. NAN,
      I am going to check with my Publix to see if they have that price. If so, I will be using my oven, too. Well, maybe I can get one to fit into my crock pot.

      I never bake a turkey with stuffing. But, I have a new pressure canner that I want to try out. The turkey would be cooked first, then canned. Yes, I will keep out enough to eat on for a few days.

      Thanks for that price tip!

      Delete
  2. I love yogurt in any form but really love it with black cherries. I have used it with red wine vinegar and sweetener for salad dressing. Also mixed with dill and horseradish on sandwiches. Thanks for the chart. It will come in handy. People under estimate the value of good bacteria.

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    1. carol,
      Thanks for those ideas. I will make both those. I think I am beginning to appreciate it.

      Delete
  3. I make my own yogurt and then Greek-ify it by straining it through a flour-sack dish towel. You end up with a much milder product as well as a thicker one. I eat it with fruit compote; lately that's been raspberry or rhubarb, or a mix of the two.

    You can strain commercially purchased yogurt and get pretty much the same effect. However, the commercially made yogurt has pectin in it. The homemade kind doesn't.

    I also save quite a bit of money by making my own. I can get a quart of good-quality Greek-style yogurt for about $1.50 to $1.75 (and we use the whey for other cooking projects). Recently I got close-dated milk for $2.25 per gallon, which meant that the yogurt was about $1.12 per quart.

    It's my favorite way to get calcium, since I don't like drinking milk.

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    Replies
    1. Donna,
      I haven't strained any yet, but have the flour-sack dishtowel.


      I checked the Cabot yogurt, and it doesn't have pectin. It had much fewer ingredients than the others.

      A quart of Cabot was $2.88. I am surprised since you have said things are more expensive in Alaska. Milk is $2 or less here. Yes, it will be cheaper, especially for me, to make yogurt.

      I love milk. I don't know what I am thinking, talking about making yogurt or even buying it. I am supposed to give up dairy products for a month. I did give up the milk without much pain, but just completely ignored the fact that milk is not the only dairy product. The allergist is not going to like this.

      Thanks for the comment. It is always interesting hearing prices in your area.

      Do you use a thermometer for heating the milk? It seems I remember you sort of knew and did not use the thermometer.

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