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Saturday, August 27, 2016

Oats Overview Information

OATS Overview Information

Oat is a plant. People use the seed (oat), leaves and stem (oat straw), and bran (the outer layer of whole oats) to make medicine.

Oat bran and whole oats are used for high blood pressure; high cholesterol; diabetes; and digestion problems including irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diverticulosis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), diarrhea, and constipation. They are also used for preventing heart disease, gallstones, colon cancer, and stomach cancer.

People use oats for joint pain (rheumatism), fatigue, a fatigue-related condition called neurasthenia syndrome, withdrawal from nicotine and narcotics, and lowering high uric acid levels that can cause gout. Oats are also used for anxiety, excitation and stress; as well as for weak bladder and kidney ailments. Other uses include connective tissue disorders, skin diseases, fat redistribution syndrome associated with HIV treatment, and as a tonic.

Oat straw is used for the flu, swine (H1N1) flu, coughs, bladder disorders, joint pain, eye ailments, frostbite, gout, and a skin infection called impetigo.

Topically, oats are used for skin conditions including itchiness, dryness, oiliness, weeping eczema, and contact dermatitis. Oats are also applied to the skin for chicken pox, osteoarthritis, liver disorders, and added to foot baths for chronically cold or tired feet.

In foods, oats are used as a grain or cereal.

In manufacturing, oats are included in some bath products and soaps.

How does it work?

Oats might help reduce cholesterol and blood sugar levels and control appetite by causing a feeling of fullness. Oat bran might work by blocking the absorption from the gut of substances that contribute to heart disease, high cholesterol, and diabetes.

Your turn
Okay, that all sounds interesting. I wonder how oats applied to the skin can help liver disorders. Does anyone have opinions on this article?

16 comments:

  1. I know some of these things, some of it is commonly used home remedy and the heart health benefits are well established but some of it sounds far fetched.

    What was the source?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. kylie,
      It was Web Md. I thought I had the source included!

      Delete
  2. I love oats and credit oatmeal almost every morning to my good cholesterol score- it hovers around 165 and I'm overweight too! Publix had BOGO and I bought 4- just the old fashioned kind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will have to check that out. I, too, love oats.

      Delete
  3. Oats, the new super food.
    Which our grandparents and their grandparents knew about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We ate oats as a child and we all loved it. My mother, born in 1921 ate it as a child and also loved it.

      Delete
    2. Elephant's Child-Spot on. We need to get back to the basics again.
      Linda-Thanks for the reminder!!!

      Delete
    3. Sonya Ann,
      I know a woman who gives her children Breakfast Bars. When I protested the kids having cookies for breakfast, she pointed out the package said they were breakfast bars. She was lazy and clueless, mostly lazy. We ate eggs and toast and prunes some mornings. Eggs and oats were our main breakfasts.

      Delete
    4. Wife made an Oatmeal Breakfast cookie when the boys were young, used on morning rush days. Made like oatmeal with a little honey and peanut butter added, then baked like cookies. 3 or 4 filled them up and they were healthy.

      Delete
    5. Tom,
      They do sound like a healthy breakfast in a rush. My children would have loved them.

      Delete
  4. I am not a fan of oatmeal so I eat steel cut because they are a little chewier, but I eat them anyway, fan or no fan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anne,
      I eat the Old-Fashioned oats, but do not like the instant in the canister. I have a canister of steel cut and have never tried it. I should.

      Delete
  5. I love oatmeal! It is my matutinal duty to consume some.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Ur-apo,
      I love oats, too. However, I am a nocturnal oats eater. I will eat it any time of the day and often eat it twice in a day.

      Delete
  6. I am just a big fan of them. In the summer, I make up "refrigerator oatmeal" so we can eat it cold in the morning. In the winter, I'll cook it up overnight in the crock (steel cut) for a warm hearty breakfast. I fed a cup a day in the middle of the day to my puppy her first year because she was too darned skinny.

    I've used it on my skin too, but I much prefer to ingest it because it can be prepared so many tasty ways!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alex,
      I just never liked cold oatmeal even though I know people who say it tastes like ice cream. I bet the puppy got fat fast. You are more adventurous than I since I only eat it fixed one way. I may just put some one my skin one day. Oats seem to be good for so many things.

      Delete

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