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Saturday, August 10, 2013

Thelma Got Her Groove Back

TWO eggs today!
I am not uncaring or cheap, but I do like getting two eggs when I have two hens. Thelma has been laying these large eggs for four years. She is a large hen. Patsy Cline is smaller and will always lay smaller eggs. Thelma laid the larger egg, almost three inches long and quite heavy and with a large girth. This is also exciting because I have not gotten two eggs for five weeks.

Thelma was attacked and Lucy was killed on July 7, 2013. Thelma was quite depressed until I got Patsy Cline for her to snuggle with. She also stopped laying. Actually, Patsy Cline gave Thelma a reason to live--to put Patsy Cline in her place. So, after a month, she is back in all her egg-laying glory.

Not only am I thrilled to see more eggs, I am happy for Thelma because this indicates that whatever injuries she sustained have healed well. I had resigned myself to the fact her laying days were over. Not so. Is this a sign her injury has healed sufficiently?

Now, I can return to freezing two containers of two eggs each week in anticipation of a winter slowdown in egg production!

Be sure to enter the Bear Grylls giveaway right here if you want to win a survival bracelet. The deadline is August 13 at midnight.

Your turn
Would you take Thelma's egg as a sign she is healed sufficiently? That no more trauma exists on her body? She is the first injured hen. Most just end up dead.

12 comments:

  1. I am not a veterinarian. I am a competent but not wealthy alpaca and horse farmer who keeps chickens and ducks for eggs and alpaca entertainment. I would take it as a very good sign that she would continue to produce eggs for a while. Is she comfortable as she lays them ? Does she look healthy and happy ?

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  2. Jane,
    I was not here when she when she was laying it. I rarely see that. She seems like always before. Yes, she looks happy, no more depression, no limping except when she runs. She jumps to the porch railing and flies off and lands without a stumble, talks to me, pecks and scratches and takes dust baths. Now--eggs. So, that is why I am taking this as a complete recovery. Thanks.

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  3. I thought there had to be a rooster present for eggs to be laid. Or is that just to have baby chicks? We had pigs, a mule, etc., on the farm when I was little, but never a chicken. Mom was scared of them.

    AND, how do you freeze eggs? Mine ACCIDENTALLY froze in the refrigerator and they all cracked and exploded, and the whites were icky thick.

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    Replies
    1. lotta joy,
      I take two eggs at a time, beat well with a beater, then pour into 4 oz. Ball freezing/canning jars. I use one large egg and one small to make 4 oz. This is good for a breakfast. I do have a chocolate pound cake recipe that calls for 5 eggs, so I use a half pint Ball freezing/canning jar for those 5 eggs.

      You do not need a male for a female to produce and egg whether it a human or animal. However, you do need a rooster to get chicks. I cannot have a rooster here.

      I am terrified of roosters. I would have to carry a shotgun around the yard if I did have a rooster! Hens are okay.

      Delete
  4. Chickens are hardy creatures. Mine have survived all sorts of calamities over the years. Strangely, sometimes the whole flock will just stop laying for no appreciable reason, then after awhile they start again. I'm glad your wounded chicken is doing better. You do get attached to them.

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    Replies
    1. Harry,
      Mine sleep outdoors in temperatures down to 9 degrees Fahrenheit. Thelma is one of the original four I had, so losing her would really the end of my original "flock." I was prepared to feed her and get no eggs ever again. Thanks for understanding.

      Delete
  5. Laying eggs is definitely a good sign. I'm glad the girls have settled in together!

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  6. Wendy,
    Shockingly, it only took one night apart, then the next night, they cuddled. There has not been one issue since. And, when Patsy Cline gave me an egg after her second night, I felt she was fine with her move here. Thanks for the comments.

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  7. Yep, when I was a boy, and our hens were attacked, they were invariably either dead or dying, so I would guess that she's one lucky hen.

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    Replies
    1. Snowbrush,
      She is the first survivor! That is lucky--to be only left with a small limp.

      Delete
  8. Thelma's egg is huge! Does she lay this size every single time? It seems she has healed from her trauma. Thank goodness!

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    Replies
    1. Sue,
      Occasionally, the egg is not that large. But, that is her usual for the last four years. I am impressed and amazed ever time I get one. I like her resuming laying, but even more than that, it seemed she was healed.

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